Didem Doğan

Human Kind’s Gift to Nature: Inhotim

I had never heard of Inhotim. One of the days I watched an interview on CNN International, which was about Brazil’s most affluent citizen’s project of building a large park in a vast wooded area that would house modern art pieces. He was a mining tycoon, Bernardo de Mello Paz. He started to buy lands in the state of Minas Gerais, in Brumadinho where the Institute of Inhotim is located. From mid 1980s to 2000s the dream-idea to build a huge park where several art works belonging to artists from all over the world came to become real and the museum park was opened to public in 2006. Located aprox. two hours from Belo Horizonte you need to arrive early in the morning and spend the whole day to visit the whole park. It is a massive park where one can travel around in golf carts. I lost myself in a paradise, travelling through tropical trees and admiring the art works: a ship upside down, sculptures that somersault, all as I listened to the sound of the universe coming from a recording device buried meters beneath the earth. A skeleton lying in a hammock, earthenware letters sprawled beneath the trees…To be more precise, human kind’s reason was sprawled here, and more importantly you could hear humanity’s dreams scream and sing in the infinity of this planet, trying to leave behind a trace. Some artists and their art works: Troca Troca is three colourful beatles standing one behind other, belongs to Luis Andrade. The Italian artis Guiseppe Penone’s Elevazione is a tree on the air that looks like a space craft. The Brazilian artist Edgard de Souza’s three sculptures are movements of the body that turn a somersault. Another work of Cildo Meireles is Inmensa, tables on one another, one huge table at top. And Chris Burden’s Beam drop are huge rectangular iron sticks that look like thrown on earth from the space.