Didem Doğan

Miro & Christian Boltanski in The Museum of Fine Arts, Recoleta

Buenos Aires’ Recoleta is city’s the most chic neighbourhood; it is also home to many museums such as Malba, Museum of Fine Arts, Architecture Museum. The Museum of Fine Arts is right across the Recoleta Cemetery, this elegant pink building is where the richest art collection from the 19th European painting in South America is found: Rodin, Gauguin, Degas, Van Gogh, Made, Modigliani, also the painters from the 20th century such as Picasso, De Chirico. It is open to public and the entrance is free. The 4th of November is Museum Nights in Buenos Aires and you can visit it till 03.00 a.m. When I’m visiting the museum in early November there is a temporary exhibition of the Catalan painter 'Miro: the experience of looking’. Also the work of French sculpture Christian Boltanski in Bienalsur which is told in another story. Talking about Miro, I come across to a book about him 'The Colour of my Dreams' and it gives me many clues to his interesting life: Another genius who sought his own path in the extraordinary course of the 20th century was born in Catalonia. Rather than the method of a painter who aims to master his art in order to express himself, Joan Miro chose to return to the primitive gaze dating back to the cave man era of humanity, unlearning every kind of edification in order to see the reality as it is through naked eyes. Like other people he too came across those who chose the same path. Like other people he too went to the Mecca of artists during his time and met Picasso. Their conversations narrated in Colours of My Dreams indicate a shared sense of citizenship blended with camaraderie, perhaps because both of them were away from the lands where they were born. The stance of artists who fled the fascist Spain during the rule of Franco, the scream-like expression in their works, their commitment to surrealism which was then the common language of the art world-we witness all of these in Miro’s works.